Posted in General, serial, Seventh, writing

Seventh Part Ten

Part One | Part Two | Part Three | Part Four | Part Five | Part Six | Part Seven | Part Eight | Part Nine

Crystal stared at the maps in front of her, knowing they could tell her nothing she didn’t already know. They hung on the wall behind her usual worktable, dotted and colored with painstaking detail. She’d made meticulous notes over the years. Her gift worked to let her find things she needed, but it was easier when she knew where to look.

Had it been winter, there wouldn’t have even been a question. She could have brought entire carts of it back from the northern side of the mountain in a day, maybe two. A single bag would have been easy.

With summer nearing its peak, there was no way to get even a flake, much less keep it frozen all the way back to Lucinda’s cave.

The door opened, banging into the wall behind it and she looked up. “Crystal? Crystal!”

Juniper slammed the door shut again and pulled her to her feet. The feel of icy hands on her skin startled her. “You’re freezing, are you alright?”

“Yes, yes, yes! I’m fine. Don’t worry about me. I have it.”

“Have what?” Crystal said and Juniper grinned.

“The bag of snow,” she said.

It took Crystal at least a full minute to properly understand what Juniper was saying. “How?”

“I have a friend,” Juniper said. Her excitement came through as a bright glow on her face. “Who knows another person, who once spoke with Godmother Dawn, and they recalled from speaking with Godmother Dawn about where to find a very tiny patch of ice.”

“Ice?”

“Ice,” Juniper said. Her cheeks remained flushed as if she’d just stepped in from a light winter snow, and her eyes blazed with delight.

“Is that why you’re so cold right now? You’ve been digging in ice?”

“What? Oh. Oh, I hadn’t even noticed. That’s not important, what’s important is that I have the bag.”

“A bag of unmelted snow.”

“Yes! The only condition is that I can’t simply give it to someone, I have to trade it,” Juniper said.

“I—oh. You’re not going anywhere near that cave.”

“Of course not. I’ll trade it to you. I can think of at least half a dozen things I’m willing to trade it for. A hot cup of tea sounds lovely.”

“Then one cup of tea, unsweetened, for your bag of snow?” Crystal offered it with a faint lift of her brow. She knew how Juniper liked her tea and the resulting grin was enough to lighten her own bleak mood.

“Agreed.”

“Good,” Crystal said and kissed Juniper’s cheek. “You’re absolutely frozen. It’s a good thing I just took the kettle off. It should still be hot.”

The water was still steaming as Crystal poured it over the leaves. Juniper settled to the kitchen table, her delight clear. The smell of hot tea spread through the kitchen.

“How exactly did you get it?” Crystal questioned as she set the kettle down. She scooped one of the last tarts out of the basket on the sideboard as well.

“Oh, well,” Juniper hummed a little. “It’s a bit…of a story.”

“What sort of story?”

“Nothing serious,” Juniper said. “I just had to go argue with an ice spirit, that’s all. Listen, the bag will only work for a year and a day and it can’t be given, only traded.”

“A year and a day?” Crystal brought the steaming cup over and Juniper wrapped her hands around it.

“Yes,” Juniper said and then smiled, pulling it from her belt. “As agreed. One cup of tea for one bag of snow.”

Crystal took the bag with care. It felt like simple, plain leather and she frowned as she opened it.

“Juni, it’s empty.”

“It is,” Juniper agreed. “Now turn it over.”

A little concerned that Juniper had gotten tricked by a spirit, Crystal nevertheless complied. A few soft flakes drifted out, falling to the kitchen floor where they melted, dotting the floor with miniscule puddles as they faded from crystal to water.

“Snow,” she said.

“One bag of snow,” Juniper said. “It will only work for a year and a day.”

“And after that it will return to being a leather pouch,” Crystal said.

“Yes. If anyone attempts to gift it, it will also stop working, or so I’ve been warned.”

It was probably information she should give Lucinda, she realized, but right now she was more concerned with how cold Juniper was.

“Juni, what did you trade?”

Juniper hesitated and then sighed. “I know you liked that ribbon I wore,” she said and Crystal smiled as she came around to hug her. “And a day of my warmth,” she said.

“Silly, I only like that ribbon because you enjoy wearing it,” Crystal said. “I’m more worried you’ll get too cold.”

“It’s summer,” Juniper replied. “I’ll be alright.”

“Still. I’ll ask Mica and Jasper to stay with you.”

“What about Coal and Jet?”

“I’ll have Coal come with me,” Crystal said.  “Jet can keep watch for us from the farm.”

Juniper smiled and stood, wrapping her arms around Crystal. “Just come back to me, that’s all I ask.”

“Always,” Crystal promised and squeezed her for a moment. “I won’t be long.”

They separated and Juniper smiled. “I have some sewing to do anyways,” she said. “It’s tedious, but I can sit on the back step. It should be plenty warm enough there with the sun.”

Crystal nodded. “I’ll send Mica and Jasper along soon,” she promised.

“Thank you,” Juniper said.

Crystal took the time to collect her lantern, and her longer knife before she left. The farm wasn’t far outside of town, but it still took her several long minutes to reach it. As she approached, she could already see the where her brothers were focusing their efforts, trying to catch up on the work they had missed in the days they’d been trapped by Lucinda.

She knocked all the same, though part of her told her she could have easily gone in. It had been her parent’s home, the same place she’d spent her childhood in.

It wasn’t until Coal swung the door open that she dared to step inside. “What’s wrong?” he asked.

“I have the next item,” she said and a thump from the other room heralded Jasper as he shuffled in. She glanced at him and then back to Coal. “I want you to go with me, and wait at the entrance.”

“Why not go all the way in with you?”

“I can’t risk you like that,” Crystal said. “But I’m not silly enough to think I can carry Flint all the way back home by myself if I don’t get him out before sunset.”

“The sunlight,” Jasper said. “That’s what wakes us.”

Crystal nodded as she looked at him. “Juniper’s at home, can you and Mica sit with her?”

“Of course, but why?”

“That’s how we got the bag of snow,” Crystal said. “There’s a patch of ice she knew where to find, so she traded one day of warmth for the bag of snow. I just want someone to stay and look after her, just in case.”

“We’ll do it,” Jasper said.

“You haven’t even told Mica,” Coal argued and Jasper chortled.

“We’ll do it,” he said. “Are you certain about this?”

“I am,” she said.

“Then let’s go,” Coal said and pulled another lantern from the hook by the door.

“I’ll go get Mica now,” Jasper promised and turned, shuffling off to wherever their oldest brother had hidden himself.

The path up the mountain was becoming familiar, but Crystal felt her heart pounding as she moved along it. If something went wrong, Juniper could be tangled up in the consequences.

Spirits weren’t likely to actively cause harm, but if their prices weren’t paid, they were twice as vindictive as any fae.

Coal stopped her at the entrance. “Are you sure it’s safe for you to go alone?”

“No,” Crystal said. “But I’m even less certain that Lucinda won’t try and tangle you up in this mess as well.”

“I just don’t want you getting hurt,” Coal said.

“I won’t,” Crystal said. “I know what I can offer and I know what she wants.”

“That doesn’t mean much,” Coal counseled. “Don’t take anymore risks than you absolutely have to.”

She smiled. “I won’t,” she said and took a second to adjust the lantern wick. “I’ll be back. Hopefully before sundown.”

Coal only nodded, but his expression indicated he wasn’t sure he liked it. Crystal inhaled once, slowly, and turned back to the cave. A soft wind made the air inside whistle and she had to steel herself for a moment before she went down, stepping into the darkness of the blood fae’s realm.

 

 

Posted in serial, Seventh, writing

Seventh Part Nine

Part One | Part Two | Part Three | Part Four | Part Five | Part Six | Part Seven | Part Eight

It was evening by the time they reached the cave. With the evening shadows falling on the rocks, two pale faces stood out, clear against the pitch of the cave behind them. Lucinda chuckled a little as they pulled the cart to a stop.

“The family reunited,” she hummed a little and Crystal drew herself upright, trying to ignore the tension in her neck and shoulders. “One branch of harpy wood, for one brother.”

“One branch, one brother,” Crystal agreed.

Lucinda hummed a little and lifted a hand. Her fingers clicked and instantly, Jet fell forward, dropping onto the ground. Mica and Coal both jerked, as if going to him, only to have Jasper stop them. His gaze however, remained on Lucinda’s face as though he could burn through her with his glare alone.

“We are agreed,” Lucinda hummed and Crystal nodded, motioning to the branch.

“The branch and the branch alone are yours,” she said.

Another click, and the branch vanished, replaced by Jet’s sleeping form. “As agreed,” Lucinda said. “The next item I require is a bag of snow.”

“A bag of snow?”

“Unmelted,” Lucinda said. Her smile displayed her upper fangs. “I’m not picky about where it comes from, but if it proves too hard do remember I can only convert one of your brothers should you choose to skip an item.”

“I’m not leaving any of my brothers behind,” Crystal snarled and jerked towards Lucinda. Jasper’s hand on her shoulder kept her from going too far.

“That’s up to you,” Lucinda said with a shrug. “I’m only giving you options. A bag of snow.”

With that, both she and Blake vanished into the shadows again, fading as the last of the evening sunlight did.

Crystal ground her teeth together and jerked away from Jasper to climb into the back of the with Jet.

“It’s too dark already,” Mica said as she tried to lift Jet up. “There’s not enough sunlight.”

Her jaw tightened until she felt her teeth might break. Forcing herself to inhale, she had to drop her head.

“Let’s get him home,” she said.

The others only nodded once. The horse snorted when Coal clicked his tongue, and started forward again, pulling the cart behind it as they wound down the path.

Years of use had made the road smooth though she could see little divots from other traveling carts. The sun had faded from the horizon by the time they reached town, with the sky truly blackened when they reached the cottage.

A few lights had been left on, but Crystal still jumped out into the darkness, mulling where she could possibly get a bag of snow from. It was summer, none of the mountains would have any.

The door opened, the rattle of the handle jolting her out of her thoughts. Juniper stepped out onto the porch, holding the door as Mica and Jasper worked to pull Jet from the cart and then to haul him up the stairs.

“I’ll get the cart and the horse,” Coal said and nudged Crystal. “I’m sure you want to talk to her.”

Crystal nodded, just once and came up the porch, inhaling a little as she took Juniper’s hand.

“Are you…?” Juniper left it hanging and Crystal smiled.

“I’m alright,” she promised and reached up to retrieve the ribbon falling from Juniper’s hair. “I’m more upset that I keep having to wander off while you’re here.”

“I don’t mind as long as you come home again,” Juniper said and Crystal smiled at that. “You’re peeved.”

“I’m not sure how to solve this one,” she admitted. “She wants a bag of snow.”

“A bag of snow?”

“Yes. Unmelted. There won’t be snow around for miles and even if there was, getting it back before it melts could be impossible,” Crystal explained.

A faint sigh escaped Juniper, and from the candlelight seeping through from the door highlighted the thoughtful pursing of her lips. They stood in silence a moment before Juniper shook her head and squeezed Crystal’s hand. “We’ll think of something,” she said and tugged gently to get Crystal moving up and into the house again. “Did she say how big?”

“No. Just that it was to be a bag of snow.”

“Then tomorrow we’ll need to figure out where to find snow, and how to get a bag of it back.”

 

Posted in serial, Seventh, Stories, writing

Seventh Part Eight

Part One | Part Two | Part Three | Part Four | Part Five | Part Six | Part Seven

Crystal’s blessing allowed her to find the things she needed, sometimes in places they shouldn’t have been. And yet, as she looked at the bare trees stretching below them about a day’s ride south of their little town, she couldn’t help but worry that she’d been, perhaps a little too hasty in deciding this was a good idea.

Harpies flocked twice a year, once in spring and once in fall. With the summer underway, the majority flew out to hunt over the sea, unconcerned for who whatever fool came to disturb their nesting sites.

Most did, at least. There were always a few who were old or sick who would remain behind to scavenge what they could.

Even from a hill at the top of the valley Crystal could see the signs of harpy roosting. The trees were all bare, branches scraped and scratched up. Bones littered the ground, some snapped in half to get at the marrow inside.

Next to her, Coal lifted his telescope, scanning the valley a little more thoroughly. “I’m not seeing any movement,” he said.

“That only tells me there’s no harpies right now,” Crystal said.

“That should be a good thing,” Coal decided.

“For now,” she said and turned to look at Mica and Jasper, both of whom lifted a brow. “I hope you two are ready.”

Mica nodded, hefting his axe. “Let’s go find a harpy’s branch,” he said.

There were two things Crystal knew about harpies. The first was that they were aggressive. The second was that they were masters at ambush. In spring, the empty branches provided camouflage for their natural tan, white and brown feathers. In the fall their plumage changed to reflect the golds and reds of the leaves they stripped from trees to make their nests. Juniper had explained once why their colors changed, but Crystal hadn’t understood it.

They eased down the path, keeping their eyes peeled. Here and there, Crystal reached down, plucking up a stray flower or two, or else a tiny bit of something she knew she could use later. Twice her hands found little field mice, who she picked up and gently set aside.

Finding mice in a field that should have been otherwise empty did little to ease her nerves. Few things wandered into a harpy nesting site.

Fewer things wandered back out.

“Here,” she said. One old tree had been split into three. The bark had been scraped away, and claw marks showed where talons had once been. An entire branch hung only by the barest sliver of wood, shearing a section away from the trunk.

Mica nodded as he tested the edge of his axe out of habit. He looked around once more before he took a stance. Next to her, Crystal heard as Coal readied his bow. Jasper only looked around, one hand resting on the large knife he had on one hip.

She didn’t like how quiet and tense it was as Mica lifted his axe.

The first thud of the axe against the wood made her jolt, and the second resounded across the empty trees.

Another thud and the branch creaked and fell, rattling and smacking other branches on the way down. It was easily the right size.

And yet, the movement of its fall didn’t cease. Crystal’s gaze moved upwards, to something brown and white as it shifted away from the trunk of another nearby tree.

“Harpy!”

Her shout alerted her brothers and Coal turned, firing as the owl-feathered harpy leapt from its branch with a shriek.

She dove to the side, one hand grabbing whatever she could. A rock, she saw and she sprang up again as Jasper unsheathed his knife. Coal’s arrow had caught one wing, but the harpy swept over again and then turned, using her teeth to pluck the arrow out of her weather. A jerk of the harpy’s jaw and she snapped the arrow shaft.

Crystal flung the stone. It connected with the harpy’s temple and the harpy shrieked again before it dove for them. This time, Coal’s arrow sank through a leg and the harpy yelped as it fell.

Mica’s axe was quick, cleaving down towards the neck. Another shriek, and the harpy leapt up, blood leaking down its leg and dripping over feathers from a shoulder. Crystal grabbed something else from the ground and threw it, not realizing until it actually smacked into the harpy’s chest that she’d thrown a skull from some poor creature.

The harpy however, didn’t seem to notice as Coal notched another arrow. She screamed again and this time dove for Jasper.

His knife sank deep and he ripped it out again even as her talons clawed at his side. She shrieked, spiraling upwards into the heights and then twisting. This time, Crystal’s grasping fingers found only the empty egg shells of hatched young.

Coal’s arrow pierced the other leg and the harpy shrieked again before she turned, flying off with cackles and screams of fury. They sat there for a long moment before Crystal stood.

“Jasper,” she said.

“It’s a scratch,” he said.

“From a harpy,” she said and opened her bag. The potion she needed to ward off infection came to hand easily, followed by a roll of bandages.

“I’ll haul this back up,” Mica said. “Coal, you keep an eye out for anything else.”

Coal only nodded once. Crystal said nothing as she doused a cloth with the potion and gently wiped the blood from Jasper’s side. He grunted a little, but made no moves to pull away. At least, she decided, the cuts weren’t deep.

The bandages wound around his waist, though she wasn’t pleased with how little protection they offered as she secured the ends. She’d only brought the one smaller roll for basic first aid. An oversight for certain.

And yet, Jasper made no complaints as he squatted for a moment to help Mica pick up the branch and carry it back upwards to the horse and cart they’d brought with them. Even with the wood loaded into the back, none of the siblings stopped, pushing forward.

The afternoon sun dipped low, and reluctantly they made their stop by the side of the road.

This time Crystal took a little longer to tend the wound on Jasper’s side. It wouldn’t need stitches, but she didn’t like taking the chance it would fester.

Coal insisted on cooking and prepared a simple soup. Afterwards, Crystal sat by the fire, staring at the flames while Coal and Jasper both tried to sleep.

“You’re clever, you know,” Mica said.

“Cleverness doesn’t seem to help much,” Crystal said.

“Two brothers left, and after tomorrow, it will be only one,” Mica said.

It wasn’t the sort of thing she liked to hear and she inhaled slowly. “If something goes wrong, it could be only you six,” she said.

“We’ll find a way to rescue you,” Mica said and glanced at where Coal and Jasper were. “Without having to resort to trading ourselves.”

“I should hope you don’t need to trade yourselves away after all the work I’ve put in to get you back,” she said.

That got a laugh from Mica and he fell silent for a long moment. “What will you do about the final trade? The one for Blake’s hand?”

“I’ve already solved it,” Crystal said.

“How?” Mica questioned and Crystal smiled.

“You’ll see,” she said. “I just have to get the harpy’s branch back to Lucinda and find out what her next item is.”

“Any idea what that is?” Mica questioned and she considered it before she shrugged as she reached out, brushing the dirt away from something off-white. It took a moment before the object she’d found revealed itself to be a mouse’s skull.

“No,” she said. “But if I know anything, it won’t be something I can pick up from the market.”

Posted in serial, Seventh, writing

Seventh Part Seven

Part One | Part Two | Part Three | Part Four | Part Five | Part Six

Crystal hesitated at the cave entrance. “Are you sure you want to go alone?” Coal asked and she looked over at him. 

“I can’t leave Jasper waiting,” she said and Mica snorted. 

“We’re a little more concerned with you getting trapped,” he added. 

She smiled. “I’ll be back by sunrise.” 

The lantern didn’t illuminate nearly enough of the shadows. Even with the wick fully raised, darkness filled the cavern. Crystal continued downward, not daring to call out and knowing at least one of the blood fae had to be lurking.

It was at the same point where she’d tripped for the first time that she paused finally, looking about. 

“Others have come here, you know.” 

Lucinda’s voice came out of the shadows and Crystal turned, trying to locate where Lucinda would be. In the empty blackness with the noise bouncing around, it was impossible to pinpoint anything. 

“They usually get lost though,” Lucinda said, and a soft rustle made Crystal spin as Lucinda appeared at last. Her lips were darker today, as if freshly painted. “Caves like this are a labyrinth, and you still dare to walk them without asking for aid.” 

Crystal couldn’t be sure if it was a threat or not. “I don’t have much to offer you for your aid,” Crystal said and Lucinda smiled a little as she came closer.

“And yet you come still. You will soon make this your home, your offerings will diminish.” 

“Until they do, I will not ask for more than I can offer.” 

Lucinda hummed. “Did the fairy who blessed you give you such advice?” 

“I’ve gotten no advice from any fairy.” 

“Clever then,” Lucinda said and smiled. A faint motion and the sand in the cave pushed back, revealing the sleeping form of her brother. Jasper’s head rested on one side and Crystal felt her heart catch at how still he lay. She’d never in her life known him not to snore. “You have the Fallen Sky?” 

“Yes,” Crystal said and withdrew it from her bag. She held it out to Lucinda. “One piece of the Fallen Sky for the release of my brother.” 

“And he has been released,” Lucinda said and plucked it from Crystal’s palm. “This is beautiful,” she said and held it up, smiling a little. “Truly a perfect piece.” 

Crystal said nothing but inhaled deeply. The softest sigh escaped Lucinda’s lips and she motioned to Jasper, lying on the sand. “Your brother is yours. Next I will require a harpy’s branch.” 

“A harpy’s branch,” Crystal repeated. Already her thoughts were turning it over.

“Yes. At least as long as you are tall,” Lucinda said and smiled a little. “In exchange I will release your next brother. Are we agreed?” 

“Agreed.” That single word chased out all other echoes and Lucinda smiled, openly displaying her fangs.

The lantern flickered for just a moment and Lucinda was gone in that faint shadow, leaving Jasper lying on the floor next to Crystal.

Crystal inhaled slowly and then bent, hauling Jasper up. She just had to get him to the entrance. 

The entire time she hauled him through the cave, letting the faint light of her lantern lead illuminate the rocks around them, she tried to think of how she might be able to get the harpy’s branch. There were only a few places to look, each one posing its own perils. 

Jasper’s weight pulled on her. He was half a foot taller than she was, and where she hunted up herbs and dried plants most of the day, he worked the soil and wrestled sheep for shearing. The difference in their physiques made dragging him through the cave an exhausting task. 

A few steps from the entrance her legs shook and threatened to give out. The shift of starlight told her someone had come to the entrance. “I see them,” Mica said. 

Crystal pushed forward, her legs aching and burning. As soon as she was close enough, Mica pulled Jasper from her arms and Coal caught her in a hug. Mica lay Jasper down, tapping at his forehead and shaking his shoulders. Jasper slept on, oblivious to his brother’s attempts to wake him. 

“He won’t wake until the sunlight touches his face,” Crystal said. Weariness seeped into her voice, rendering it raspy. 

“That’s not for hours,” Coal said.

“Crystal, you’re the smallest, you’ll have to sit on the horse with him and keep him on until we can get him down to home again,” Mica said and Crystal nodded as she rubbed at the shoulder she’d had Jasper leaning against. 

Home, she decided. Home and then in the morning she would need to hunt up a harpy’s branch. Home to where Juniper would be. 

Her thoughts wandered over what she knew of blood fae, and then to what she knew of harpies. She was only vaguely aware of how much work it was taking to keep her slumbering brother on the horse. 

“Let me take him,” Mica said and Crystal jerked, nearly losing her grip on Jasper. She realized she’d spent the entire time lost in thought as the cottage door opened, letting her see Juniper in her nightgown. 

“What’s happened?” Juniper asked.

“We’ve got him,” Mica promised as Juniper hurried down. With a grunt, Mica and Coal both managed to slide Jasper off the saddle. His one foot smacked Crystal’s thigh, but she only sort of winced while the horse snorted under her. 

She patted the horse’s neck before she slid down and turned, wanting to explain it to Juniper.

She couldn’t. The words failed her and Juniper’s worried face broke the last of Crystal’s resolve. She knew Juniper had recognized it too because she tossed her arms around Crystal, letting Crystal bury her face against one shoulder, trying to breathe around the tears. 

“Crystal?” Coal’s voice sounded panicked. She felt Juniper motion her brothers off.

“Let’s get him inside and then we’ll get the horse,” Mica advised. 

“Thank you,” Juniper said. Crystal didn’t bother looking up, still trying not to let her tears fall. 

The door closed for a moment, and then opened again. The horse snorted as it was led off and Crystal sniffed. “Sorry,” she managed.

“There’s no need for you to apologize,” Juniper said gently and pulled back a little to lift Crystal’s chin. “You’ve slept so little and badly, not to mention I know dealing with fairies can be stressful anyways, never mind when you’re bargaining with others’ lives.” 

Crystal hiccupped and Juniper smiled. “I—I have to get—”

“Some tea, and at least half a night’s decent sleep before you get anything else,” Juniper said firmly and looped her arm around Crystal’s waist. “I’ll get the kettle on, you can just sit at the table a bit. Maybe a bite or two will help.” 

Crystal wasn’t sure she’d put much support in that theory, but then as Juniper led her up the stairs and then to the kitchen table, being home again made it a little easier to stave off the tears.

Listening while Juniper puttered about their kitchen and made a cup of tea and buttered a biscuit from supper, Crystal’s breathing quavered and she dropped her head, looking at the woodgrain of the table in front of her. 

A plate clinked as it was set in front of her and she jerked her head up to look at Juniper. “What was I thinking?” 

“That you love your brothers,” Juniper said and settled to the seat next to her. “It’s alright to be scared.” 

“I can’t—I can’t do this,” Crystal said. “The apple wasn’t hard, but the glass could have drowned me and the if the groundskeeper had caught Mica or I—”

“He makes a lot of threats, but he’s harmless,” Juniper said. “And I know you well enough to know you’ve probably already got a basket planned for that old grump.” 

“She wants a harpies branch as long as I am tall.” 

Juniper stayed silent a moment before she inhaled. “There’s a few places they roost and it’s summer now.” 

“That doesn’t mean they’ll all be gone.” 

“No, but there will be less of them.” 

The door creaked open and Juniper looked over as Mica poked his head in. “We’re—”

“Going to come in and stop leaving my door hanging open is what the two of you are going to do,” Juniper said. Crystal smiled as she looked down at her tea while she considered her options. 

“I’ll need to leave early tomorrow,” she said.

“For what?” Coal asked and Crystal lifted her head again.

“The nearest harpy roost is at least a day’s ride away,” she said. “Do you mind if I borrow the cart?” 

“Yes, I mind,” Mica said. “At least I do if you think you’re going after something in a harpy’s roost without my help.” 

Our help,” Coal corrected. “Can you wait until Jasper’s awake? Or at least half-awake. He’ll take an hour in the morning to get anywhere near functional.” 

“I don’t want you to risk yourselves.” 

“And we’re not risking you,” Coal said firmly. “What do we do first?” 

“I think the first thing we need to do is get some hot tea in Crystal. You two need to get in the trunk at the end of the hall and find some blankets for yourselves. You want an early start, so you can just spend the night here,” Juniper said firmly and made a little shooing motion. 

Looking a little bit like shamed children, both her brothers sauntered off towards the hall. Crystal looked at her tea. 

“I don’t know how this is going to help.” 

“It’s going to help you sleep. You’re tired and stressed. You need some rest or you’ll make a mistake,” Juniper said. “And fae like that will capitalize on anything they can.” 

“Even if I don’t make a mistake—”

“You’re also exhausted and that’s making it harder for you to think,” Juniper said and tipped Crystal’s chin up. “A cup of tea, a little bit to eat and some rest will help.” 

“I just don’t know what I’m going to do,” Crystal said.

“It would help if you’d listen to me,” Juniper said and Crystal managed a smile.

“I’m whining, aren’t I?” 

“A touch,” Juniper agreed. “We’re not finished yet, thank you.” 

Crystal smiled a little and pulled the tea closer. “I can’t do more tonight anyways, I suppose.” 

“You can’t,” Juniper said. “Let me make up the bed while you at least sip that.” 

“I promise. The fattest, sweetest blackberries I can find.” 

“I believe that,” Juniper said and smoothed a stray lock of hair back behind Crystal’s ear. “Believe me when I tell you there’s always a solution.” 

“I hope you can come up with one because I don’t have one.” 

“Three for three isn’t bad,” Juniper replied. “Now get some tea in you. You’re terribly grumpy when you’re exhausted like this.” 

That earned a soft chuckle and Crystal finally picked up the cup. She inhaled the steam before she took a sip and smiled. “Lavender and chamomile,” she said.

“You keep telling me those two are the best for calming,” Juniper said loftily as she stood. “I suppose we’ll see how good they are.” 

Posted in serial, Seventh, Stories

Seventh Part Six

Part One | Part Two | Part Three | Part Four | Part Five

“Juni,” Crystal pleaded as they walked. “I’m sorry.” 

“Sorry? Sorry! Crystal, you’re going to get yourself killed. That pool is deep and made of snow melt.” Juniper spun around, the loose ribbon in her hair threatening to slip the rest of the way out. 

“I don’t have to swim in it,” Crystal said. “I just have to be able to get the glass out.” 

“Correction,” Juniper said and put a finger to Crystal’s chest. “You have to get a piece of glass the appropriate size out. What were you thinking agreeing to that?” 

“That I need it for my brother,” Crystal replied. 

For a moment Juniper said nothing before she exhaled, her anger melting away. “What am I going to do with you?” 

“Hopefully answer a question for me.” 

“I’ll try, but I promise nothing else,” Juniper said and crossed her arms. “I’m very put out with you.” 

“I know, and I’ll make it up to you,” Crystal said and smiled. “I know where to find those blackberries you like so much.” 

Juniper let off a gruff little snort as she tipped her chin. “What’s your question?” 

“The son of the blood fae queen, he carried Coal to the entrance in exchange for a lock of my hair.” 

“Crystal!” 

“I know,” Crystal said. “You’ve said it a hundred times. Blood and hair are the two most powerful things to offer. But, he called it an even exchange and was determined to carry Coal all the way to the very entrance as part of that even exchange. I don’t understand why.” 

Juniper considered it for a long moment. “Well,” she said. “I don’t know everything about them, but all fairies are bound by certain rules. An even exchange means once both ends have been met, no further offers can be made on that. If he did however, and he is a blood fae as you say, the sunlight would have weakened him.” 

“I absolved him of all debts when I realized that,” Crystal said. 

“Smart,” Juniper said. “But I can’t say for certain. I don’t exactly have anyone I can ask for more details.” 

“It’s alright,” Crystal said and slid her hand into Juniper’s. “It was just something curious for me.” 

Juniper chuckled a little and tugged Crystal closer as they walked a little farther up the path and then around an outcropping to gaze at last at the pool. 

A bowl of white quartz formed the majority of the pool’s basin. A little higher up and she could see where the stones had worn smooth by the spring cascades. Now in the heat of the summer, the cascade had devolved into a melodic trickle. 

“And the glass is in the bottom?” 

“It should be,” Juniper said as she pulled the walking stick she’d brought with her out of the loop on her back. She hadn’t used it once, and yet as Crystal watched, Juniper went to the edge, holding it out as far as she could and dipping it down. As it went deeper, Juniper had to lean forward a little. 

“There’s the bottom,” she said as she withdrew it. All but a half-foot portion had been submerged. “It gets deeper.” 

The glass would be all the way at the bottom. Too deep to dive. 

Crystal approached, looking down into the pool. The water wasn’t murky, but the backing of the quartz made it hard to see passed the glittering reflection of the sun. “Alright,” she said. “Too deep to swim in. We’ll need a raft.” 

“Where are you going to find the things to build a raft with?” Juniper asked and Crystal smirked as she looked at her before she moved, clambering up and over the rocks to find what she needed.

A sigh escaped Juniper as Crystal began finding long sticks and the like. “I should know better to ask by now,” Juniper noted as she spread out the blanket Crystal had insisted on bringing with them out. 

While Crystal found the sticks she needed, Juniper worked carefully, using a roll of twine from her bag and a spare ribbon or two to make the raft. 

It was only big enough for one person and Juniper looked at it, a little concerned while Crystal lashed several longer sticks together and secured a bag to the one end of her new staff. “Are you certain about this?” Juniper asked.

“I’m always certain of your handiwork,” Crystal answered. “It’ll take me a bit to get there and back, but I can do it.” 

Crystal grinned and slid out of her shoes and left her bag behind. As an afterthought, she tugged out of her shirt. “Just in case,” she said.

Juniper harrumphed but offered nothing else as Crystal eased the raft onto the water. Once it was halfway into the water, she slid onto it, letting her weight and movement push it the rest of the way into the water. A glance back let her see that Juniper had taken to nibbling on her lower lip, a sign of her stress. 

All the same as she carefully lowered the sack into the water and used it to push herself along, the raft continued floating. As always Juniper’s work remained steady. The only concern Crystal had was tipping herself over into the chilled water. 

Peering over the edge Crystal could see some of the glass shards. The water grew into a clouded blue as she pushed herself along. The silt she raised with her movements obscured the bottom.

Most of the glass was out in the middle of the pool, but Crystal knew she wouldn’t be able to get that far. Though the raft was holding up, it wasn’t intended for a long trip and the more she moved, the more she felt it tip and shift. 

Some of the water touched her toes and she froze on instinct before she looked behind her. She needed to get back. She had plenty of pieces in her sack now, she hoped. One of them would suffice. 

Turning herself required a larger movement and water sloshed over the side, dampening her pants. She took a slow breath in as she pushed on the makeshift paddle. As the raft turned, the ripples of water spread out and away from her, crashing into the remnants of other ripples and movements. 

Inching her way back towards shore she could see Juniper on the bank, body tense and expression horrified. 

As soon as she was close enough, she reached out. Juniper caught her fingers and pulled, helping bring both raft and Crystal back to the shore. Crystal hauled herself up, one hand clenched around the staff. The bag came out, dripping and heavy. 

“Absolutely insane,” Juniper said and tossed her arms around Crystal. Laughing, Crystal returned the hug, holding Juniper close for a moment and relishing in the smell of faint lavender from her clothes. 

Letting go, Crystal smiled and reached up to tip Juniper’s chin a little. “You split your lip.” 

That got a wry smile. “I was worried. I wasn’t sure it would hold up.” 

“As always, I have your work to thank.” 

“My work would have done nothing without your usual resourcefulness,” Juniper said and moved, carefully up plucking stones out of the bag. Some she turned and threw back into the pool.  Wavelets moved across the water as she tossed the rocks back. Others she set aside, giving Crystal a chance to look at the so-called glass in the light of day. 

It wasn’t quite opaque, and tinged blue. She picked one up, feeling the water polished surface. 

“It’s quartz,” Crystal said. 

Juniper nodded as she finished sorting the rocks. “Supposedly a grand castle stood here once. It fell to ruins.” 

“And it was made of quartz?” 

Juniper shrugged. “I don’t know what happened. I can only tell you there was supposed to be a castle, and that the princess had been blessed.” 

There was a pause while Crystal pulled her shoes back on. Juniper turned, skipping a shard across the water. It sank somewhere in the middle.

“What was she blessed with?” 

Juniper had to think a moment. “If I remember, she was blessed with beauty. It’s said she was supposed to have been accidentally put under an enchanted sleep, only to be woken by a true prince.” 

“Did she ever wake up?” 

“You know how those stories go,” Juniper said. “There’s dozens of versions of them. If she never woke up, no one knows where she sleeps today to try and wake her.” 

  Crystal was silent a moment. “The fairies,” she said. “They say their blessings are always a warning.” 

“They are,” Juniper said and looked up. “I can tell you that firsthand. A blessing of resourcefulness only means you’ll face challenges that need a lot of wit. A blessing of fortune only means you’ll have both good and bad luck. Blessings of beauty attract people of greed.” She paused, reaching up to touch the locket around her neck. Crystal knew there would be a broken ring inside. “Are you alright?” Crystal asked.

“I’m fine,” Juniper replied and smiled. “These should be all the right size.” 

“It has to be at least as long as my palm,” Crystal murmured. 

“Take your pick then,” Juniper invited. 

Carefully, Crystal held her hand over the two longest. She dismissed both. It only had to be at least as long as her palm. The less she gave Lucinda, the better. The items were obscure, and Crystal wasn’t sure putting them together would do anything good. 

Then again, blood fae weren’t known to be ‘good’ fairies. 

“This one,” she decided at last and Juniper nodded as Crystal took it, tucking it carefully in the pocket of her bag.

“Then the only thing left is to put these all back,” Juniper said and Crystal laughed. “Never take more than you need.”

“I know,” Crystal said and picked up another one. “But you know I’m terrible at skipping rocks.”