Exercises

Exercise: Quiet Moments

Dialogue is a powerful tool, but it’s very rare that anyone—even characters—will come out and say exactly what they think or feel at any given moment. Instead, body language and action can help convey these things. As an exercise: Take a moment and write a slice-of-life flash fiction, showing how your characters interact with each… Continue reading Exercise: Quiet Moments

character, Exercises

The Emotion Wheel

Of the three cornerstones of storytelling, characters have to put up with a lot. Not only do they have to respond and react to the movements of plot, but they do so within the constrains of their setting. Their motives are constantly questioned and everyone almost always wants to know what their goal is. It’s… Continue reading The Emotion Wheel

Exercises

Exercise: Inserts

Characters are often the first thing a reader falls in love with. Building a detailed and dynamic character can be difficult. Thankfully, there’s plenty of ways to practice. As an exercise: Pick someone you know in real-life. Describe them as the main character in a story. Think about how they act, walk, talk and any… Continue reading Exercise: Inserts

character

Character Archetypes

Characters show up in all forms of storytelling. Be that in literature or in movies and television. That means the chances you’ve come across character archetypes already is high.  Archetypes are the typical examples of a particular person or thing. When discussing characters, it’s also a sort of model for a character. Don’t get confused… Continue reading Character Archetypes

character

Motivating the Antagonist

Think of your favorite show, or book series. More specifically, think about the villain. Think back on every terrible thing they’ve done. Now, ask yourself why they’ve done those things. If your first reaction is to say because they’re evil, or because they’re terrible people, or any reason that can be boiled down to ‘just… Continue reading Motivating the Antagonist